Acquiring Genomes: A Theory Of The Origin Of Species

Acquiring Genomes: A Theory Of The Origin Of Species

How do new species evolve? Although Darwin identified inherited variation as the creative force in evolution, he never formally speculated where it comes from. His successors thought that new species arise from the gradual accumulation of random mutations of DNA. But despite its acceptance in every major textbook, there is no documented instance of it. Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan take a radically new approach to this question. They show that speciation events are not, in fact, rare or hard to observe. Genomes are acquired by infection, by feeding, and by other ecological associations, and then inherited. Acquiring Genomes is the first work to integrate and analyze the overwhelming mass of evidence for the role of bacterial and other symbioses in the creation of plant and animal diversity. It provides the most powerful explanation of speciation yet given.

Title:Acquiring Genomes: A Theory Of The Origin Of Species
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780465043927
Format Type:

    Acquiring Genomes: A Theory Of The Origin Of Species Reviews

  • Bob Nichols

    Margulis and Sagan put forward an alternative to a neo-darwinian theory that states that evolution results from random mutations that are acted upon by the environment (natural selection). Random muta...

  • Steve Van Slyke

    I went looking for this book after readingPower, Sex, Suicide: Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life by Nick Lane in which author Margulis is mentioned several times, mostly with regard to her theory t...

  • Bill Leach

    1 - Darwinism Not NeoDarwinism- does not agree that mutations are sufficient to allow new species to be created - 99.9% of mutations are deleterious- symbiosis is the living together of two organisms-...

  • Miles

    I have to preface this review with an important admission, which is that my background in popular science literature has definitely not prepared me to fully comprehend, let alone criticize, the finer ...

  • Shea Mastison

    I first became aware of Lynn Margulis while reading Michael Behe's "Darwin's Black Box;" I was heavily skeptical when initially grabbing this, because Behe uses her as a reference to "prove" evolution...

  • Solveig

    I read this book for a science book club; unlike some of the books we have read it can't be accused of being light on the science. This is one of the good points of the book: it provides numerous exam...

  • M

    Margulis (and Dorion Sagan) have a groundbreaking theory about evolution, namely, that new species arise not from lots of minor mutations, but from the acquisition of entire genomes like when a colony...

  • Julie M

    This is my favorite book. If you want to be wowed by your own existence, read this book. I think about this book anytime I catch myself thinking that I'm more important than anyone else--which happens...

  • Fleece

    "I'm finished" as in I'm finished with this book. Got to page ninety and had to ditch it because it was terrible; not the idea, we've been taught symbiogenesis was how chloroplasts and and mitochondri...

  • Peter

    Lyn Margulis, ever the iconoclast, takes on the neodarwinists. In this book, she presents a very compelling case for the role of symbiosis in the origin of new species. She brings together the work of...